Monday, July 24, 2017

Final Project -- Keyword Map

I have posted a still-growing list of over two hundred "Keywords" below (follow this link any time for the latest version of the list). These Keywords are especially important terms or concepts that we have encountered over the course of our readings and conversations together.


For your Final assignment, you are going to construct a kind of map (or model, or memorial, or however you want to think of it) from your own perspective on the preoccupations and dilemmas we've been grappling with this term.

You will build your map out of the keywords you choose and the definitions you propose for them. Taken together, your definitions and the way you gather and present them will convey an impression, provide a narrative, make a kind of argument through which you personally make sense of the Green -- as a discourse, as a discipline, as an ideology, as an aesthetic, as a way of life, as all or some or none of these as you have come to understand it over the semester.

To make your map: 

1 You will first create three Categories entirely of your own choosing and design. 

These Categories of yours can be conceptual, practical, figurative, whatever works best for you. (Some examples of categories students have used in the past: "YES/NO/MAYBE -- YESTERDAY/TODAY/TOMORROW -- GOOD/BAD/UGLY -- ANIMAL/VEGETABLE/MINERAL.") 

2 Then include under each of these Categories a number of Keywords from our list which seem to you to be related to one another in a significant or useful way according to your chosen Categories.

3 Next, for each Keyword you choose you must provide a clear and concise definition of the term (nothing more than a sentence or so) in your own words.  

I cannot emphasize this enough: You must create your own definitions for the Keywords you have chosen, rather than relying on a dictionary or accepting a definition from one of our authors. 

4 After you have defined the term as you see fit, you should then follow that definition with a quotation from one of the assigned texts from our syllabus.

The quotation you pick should be one that is especially illuminating for the definition you have made in some way: The quotation can be a definition that yours is a variation of. The quotation can be an example or illustration that supports your definition. The quotation can provide an analogy or figure or frame that inspired your definition. The quotation can even be something that seemed so wrong to you that it provoked your definition as a kind of protest or intervention.

Your Final must provide definitions and quotations for at least forty keywords but no more than forty-five. None of your categories can contain fewer than eight keywords and none can contain more than eighteen keywords.

5 Each of your three Categories should have a Title and its own general explanatory paragraph (and I do mean a paragraph, not an essay) indicating what you mean for your category to delineate. You can also provide an opening page that orients your reader, in case your Category descriptions themselves are inadequate to get your intentions across. I also encourage you to introduce whatever visual, formal, generic, stylistic modifications or supplements into your map/presentation to bring it into more relevant conversation with your own sense of dramatic or narrative or argumentative for, your personal concerns, or experimental processes.

The deadline for the final is our last class together. This is the sort of project that is very doable if you devote some time to it, but almost impossible if you try to do it at the last minute. Everybody should give themselves several days to do this work -- especially if you know you are going to have scheduling or other issues down the line as the end of term rolls around -- since scouting through passages and notes across the whole term often yields unexpected insights and shocks of recognition that lead to revisions of your initial categorizations and keyword groupings. I hope this exercise is an enlightening and enjoyable one for you all rather than a drudgery. Be experimental, exploratory, earnest about it and you are almost sure to get incomparably more benefit from it. In the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.

If you have questions, always feel free to post them in Comments, e-mail them to me, raise them in class, or talk with me about them personally anytime at all.


Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Thread

This is a placeholder post to open up a forum in the Comments that you can use to raise questions or make observations about the texts and topics of the course outside of class.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Midterm Assignment: Precis With Toulmin Schema


According to our syllabus, you are expected to hand in a 2-3pp. precis with an attached Toulmin schema (hence, the assignment will likely be 3-4pp. total) at the beginning of class, week four, next Tuesday, July 25.

A precis is simply the concise recapitulation of a complex argument. You are expected to summarize what you take to be the argument and its essential elements for any one of the texts assigned in class from the first day to the day on which the precis is handed in. The purpose of the precis is not to argue for an interpretation of the work you choose, but to capture what you take to be the argument of the work you choose. (Needless to say, this too requires a form of interpretation, but I do hope the distinction still makes sense as far as it goes.)

Reproducing its argument will likely involve identifying what you take to be its claim, qualification, exceptions, definitions, supportive reasons and data, implicit warrants, and possibly efforts at anticipating and circumventing objections. You may also want to discuss the illustrative force of metaphors and other figures, or address stylistic effects (use of pronouns, voice, etc.).

Since so many of these elements are also at the heart of the Toulmin analysis of argument we discussed last week in class, I am asking that you append to your precis a simple Toulmin Schema identifying as many elements in your chosen argument as seems useful (do not worry if not all of the elements of the Schema we discussed appear to be in evidence in your chosen text, that happens all the time).

I hope the Schema will be a useful guide to organize and clarify your precis. Good luck and remember to ask me any questions that might occur to you!
  

Monday, July 3, 2017

The Keywords

access
agency
agriculture
agroforestry
American exceptionalism
animality
anthropocene
anthropocentrism
antibiotic resistance
apocalypse
appropriate technology
aquifer
artifice
assemblage
atmosphere
austerity
autonomy
ban
beauty
binary
biodiversity
biomimicry
biopiracy
Biosphere 2
biotechnology
biotic community
bottled water
boutique environmentalism
boycott
camp
capital
capitalism
carbon budget
carbon footprint
carbon sequestration
carbon sink
carbon tax
car culture
casualty
cattle ranching
cheap nature
chemical
"clean coal"
clear-cutting
climate
climate change
climate change denialism
climate conflict
climate debt
climate refugees
coal-oil-nuclear-gas (CONG)
co-creation
colonialism
commodity
commons
companion planting
complexity
complication
concern
consensus science
conservation
conspicuous consumption
consumer choice
Creation
credibility
crop rotation
dead zone
Deep Ecology
democracy
denial
desertification
design
despair
development
disaster caitalism
disparate impact
diversity
divestment
domination
dominion
doubt
drought
dualism
dysplacement
earth alienation
Earth Day
eco-ability
ecofeminism
eco-la-la
ecological field worker
economy
ecosocialism
ecosystem services
eden
edge effects
efficiency
endangered species
energopolitics
environmental impact study
environmental justice
Environmental Protection Agency
environmental racism
erosion
erotic
escape hatch
eugenics
externality
extraction
factory farm
famine
farmer's market
feral
fetishism
finitude
food
foodchain
food desert
food justice
footprint
fracking
futurism
Gaia
garden cities
geoengineering
geographic equity
global warming
Golden Age
The Great Acceleration
green
greenbelts
greenhouse gas
greenhouse storms
green roof
greenwashing
gross domestic product (GDP)
growth
guerilla gardening
harm reduction
hazardous waste
holistic
humanism
human nature
hyperobject
illegal logging
immaterialism
individualism
indoor pollution
industrial agriculture
industrialism
input/output
insecticide
integrated pest management
intersectional
isolation
labeling
Land Ethic
Laramie Treaties
legal personhood
liability
life
limits to growth
local
localism
localvore
lobbyist
luddite
Man-in-the-Environment
market
matriarchy
matter
meat-machine
militarism
mindfulness
misdirection
monoculture
Mother Earth
multiplicity
myth
nation
native
nature
natural
natural capitalism
naturalist
naturalization
net primary product of photosynthesis (NPP)
neurotoxin
neutral tech
NIMBYism
#NoDAPL
nonbinary
nonlinear
objectification
Oceti Sakowin
omnivore
open spaces
organic
overfishing
over-urbanization
ozone hole
Pale Blue Dot
pandemic
parks
patriarchy
"peak oil"
perennials
permaculture
pest
pesticide
Pick-Sloan Plan
pipeline
poison
pollution
polyculture
population
posthumanisms
poverty
precarity
Precautionary Principle
predation
primitivity
procedural equity
profit
progressive
protected areas
public
public comment
public good
queer eco-feminism
racism
radioactive colonialism
regulation
recycle
reduce
reductionism
reforestation
renewable
reparations
resilience
resource descent
resource wars
re-use
revolution
rhetoric
rugged individualism
rural
sacred
sanction
science
scientism
seed saving
self
sex
Shallow Environmentalism
short term thinking
social ecology
social equity
slow food
slow violence
slum
smart cities
solartopia
solidarity
stewardship
structural violence
sublime
submission
suburban
surplus people
sustainability
sustainable forestry
symbiosis
technofix
technological determinism
techno-utopianism
toxicity
toxic masculinity
Transcendentalism
treaty
Triple Bottom Line
trophy hunting
urban
urban agriculture
vegetarianism
vision
voluntary simplicity
waste
#WaterIsLife
water poverty
water protectors
weather
weed
web of life
white flight
white supremacy
whole earth
whole person
wilderness
world
zeitgeist
Zero Growth

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Our Syllabus

Summer 2017
Rhet 153: GREEN RHETORIC

Instructor: Dale Carrico: dcarrico@sfai.edu, ndaleca@gmail.com
Course Blog: http://greenrhetoric.blogspot.com/2017/06/our-syllabus.html
Meeting: July 3-August 11, 2017, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, 9-11.30am, 188 Dwinelle Hall

Rough Basis for Final Grade, subject to contingencies -- Participation/Attendance, 15%; Reading Notebook, 15%; Object Reading, 1-2pp., 10%; Toulmin/Precis, 2-3pp., 15%%; Presentation, 15%; Final Project/Keyword Map, 30%.

Course Description

Of what does "Greenness" consist? In what does "Greenness" abide? Just what is "Greenness" good for? In this course we will survey a range of key vocabularies of environmental thought and activism -- Deep Ecology, eco-socialism, eco-feminism, environmental justice, anti-civilizationism, permaculture, sustainable development, disaster capitalism, and futurological geo-engineering -- as well as engage with more specifically and indicatively American traditions, from Transcendentalism to wilderness conservation (or exterminism), the land ethic, and consumer lifestyle ecology. We will also delve into what seem to be prevalent rhetorical strategies to communicate the urgency of environmental crises and mobilize sufficient constituencies to address them. What is compelling or not about current forms of environmental journalism? What delights lie in store for the reader of international agreements on climate change and policy papers available from the Environmental Protection Agency? Does the scientificity of statistics lend force to environmental claims or alienate people from narratives of lived distress and shared threat? If liberal governance is inadequate to address environmental catastrophe are efforts to circumvent the political via macro-design strategies or micro-mindfulness lifeways more likely to succeed? Does the proliferation of environmentalist identities and subcultures facilitate necessary political organization or undermine it or simply reveal its ineradicable intersectional stratification? We will even ponder why so many environmentalist websites make recourse to similar color palettes and fonts and images. Our focus will never drift far from current dilemmas, but the premise of the course is that these dilemmas are illuminated by critical vocabularies just as the critical vocabularies are substantiated by the dilemmas to which they are applied. At the end of the term, each student will create a conceptual-keyword map tracing their own course through the course materials and finding their own settlement within them, however unsettling it may be.

Provisional Schedule of Meetings

Week One

Tuesday, July 4 -- Holiday

Wednesday, July 5 {Introductions}

Thursday, July 6 {Inconvenient Truths}
-- Screening and discussion of film, "An Inconvenient Truth" (1-2pp. Object Reading due Tuesday)
-- Bill McKibben, With the Ascent of Trump Is It Game Over for the Climate Change Fight?

Week Two

Tuesday, July 11 {Hyperobjects, Slow Violences, Number Soup, Intersections}
PRESENTATION: Britney
-- Timothy Morton, The End of the World, pp. 99-106 (more as you like)
-- Naomi Klein, Climate Rage
-- Rob Nixon, Slow Violence, pp. 1-14 (more as you like)
-- Bill McKibben, Global Warming's Terrifying New Math
-- Brentin Mock, Are There Two Different Versions of Environmentalism, One "White," One "Black"?

Wednesday, July 12 {Transcendentalist Precursors and Successors}
 PRESENTATIONS: Isaac
-- Ralph Waldo Emerson, from Nature, Read the Introduction, Nature, Commodity, Beauty (more as you like)
-- Henry David Thoreau, from Walden, Where I Lived and What I Lived For
-- Mary Austin, The Land of Little Rain, Preface, The Land of Little Rain, and The Little Town of the Grapevines
-- Aldo Leopold, Thinking Like A Mountain
-- Aldo Leopold, The Land Ethic

Thursday, July 13 {Ah, Wilderness!}
PRESENTATION:  Michael
-- PBS Site for the Ken Burns Miniseries, America's Best Idea
-- Alan Spears, No, National Parks Are Not America's "Best Idea"
-- Lisa Campbell, National Parks and Environmental Racism

-- John Muir, Save the Redwoods
-- Astra Taylor, Who Speaks for the Trees?

Week Three

Tuesday, July 18 {Deep Ecology}
PRESENTATION:  Trevor & Cloud
-- Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, A Fable for Tomorrow, The Obligation to Endure
-- Arne Naess, The Shallow and the Deep
-- Arne Naess and George Sessions, Deep Ecology Platform
-- Stephen Harding, What Is Deep Ecology?
-- Joanna Macy, The Ecological Self
-- William Cronon, The Trouble With Wilderness
-- Murray Bookchin, Social Ecology Versus Deep Ecology

Wednesday, July 19 {Eco-Feminism}
PRESENTATION:
-- Rosemary Radford Reuther, Ecofeminism
-- Cathleen and Colleen McGuire, Ecofeminist Visions
-- Catherine Keller, Dark Vibrations: Ecofeminsm and the Sacred
-- Allison Kilkenny, 5 Reasons You Should Care About Environmental Justice If You Care About Women
-- Nick Estes, This Land Was Made for Decolonized Love
-- Greta Gaard, Toward A Queer Ecofeminsm
-- Catriona Mortimer-Sandilands, Unnatural Passions? Notes to a Queer Ecology

Thursday, July 20 {Eco-Socialism}
PRESENTATIONS: Maggie
-- John Bellamy Foster, The Four Laws of Ecology and the Four Anti-Ecological Laws of Capitalism
-- Vandana Shiva, The US Patent System Legalizes Theft and Biopiracy
-- Systems Change Not Climate Change, What Is Ecosocialism?
-- Jason Moore, The End of Cheap Nature
-- David Schwartzman, From Climate Crisis to Solar Capitalism
-- John Bellamy Foster, Trump and Climate Catastrophe

Week Four

Tuesday, July 25 {Environmental Justice}
Your Midterm Precis/Toulmin Schema due at the beginning of the hour.
PRESENTATION: Edward
-- Robert Bullard, Poverty, Pollution, and Environmental Racism
-- Laura Pulido, Flint, Environmental Racism, and Racial Capitalism
-- Sarah Lazare, From Fracking to Coal Waste, NAACP Confronts Environmental Racism in North Carolina
-- Melissa Harris-Perry, Being Black on Earth Day
-- Larry Buhl, The Color of Pollution
-- Rio Declaration
-- Johannesburg Declaration

Wednesday, July 26 {Permaculture/Polyculture}
PRESENTATIONS:  Allison & Alec
-- John Zerzan, Agriculture
-- Malcolm Scully, The Destructive Nature of Our Bountiful Harvests
-- Wes Jackson and Wendell Berry, A 50-Year Farm Bill
-- Wes Jackson, Becoming Native To This Place
-- The Land Institute, Vision and Mission and Our Work
-- David Holmgren, Permaculture Design Principles
-- UN Food and Agriculture Organization, Agroforestry, Basic Knowledge (By all means, dig deeper.)

Thursday, July 27 {Green Eats} (Potluck Brunch)
PRESENTATIONS:  Nicholas O. & Lea
-- Clara Jeffery, Michael Pollen Fixes Dinner
-- Dale Allen Pfeiffer, Eating Fossil Fuels
-- Claudia Deutsch, Trying to Connect the Dinner Plate to Climate Change
-- John Vidal, Ten Ways Vegetarianism Can Help Save the Planet
-- Sarah Henry, Former Black Panther Launches Urban Farm to Give Ex-Prisoners a New Start
-- Marc Abrahams, Food for Thought
-- Gretel Schueller, The Truth Behind Food Labels
-- EPA, Food and Pesticides
-- Tom Philpott, Trump's EPA Greenlights A Nasty Chemical

Week Five

Tuesday, August 1 {Standing Rock}
PRESENTATIONS: Alan
-- History
-- Nick Estes, Fighting For Our Lives
-- Wikipedia, List of Pipeline Accidents in the 21st Century
-- Julian Brave Noisecat and Ann Spice, A History and Future of Resistance
-- Black Lives Matter, Solidarity With Standing Rock
-- Anna J. Willow and Sara Wiley, Politics, Ecology, and New Anthropology of Energy: Hydraulic Fracking

Wednesday, August 2{Peak Everything}
PRESENTATIONS: Tom K. & Julio
-- James Howard Kunstler, The Long Emergency
-- Michael Klare, Are Resource Wars Our Future?
-- Maxwell, Fuller, Brooks, and Watson, Biodiversity: The Ravages of Guns, Nets, and Bulldozers
-- Saul Landau, Reagan and Bottled Water
-- World Wildlife Fund, Deforestation
-- Kate Kelland, Antibiotics Overuse Threatens Modern Medicine

Thursday, August 3 {Green Capitalism/Disaster Capitalism}
PRESENTATION: 
-- Paul Hawken, Natural Capitalism
-- Michael Albert, Natural Capitalism?
-- Richard Stroup, Free Market Environmentalism
-- Herman Daly and Kenneth Townsend, Sustainable Growth: An Impossibility Theorem
-- The Economist, The Triple Bottom Line
-- Harvey Wasserman, King CONG vs. Solartopia
-- Bruce Watson, The Troubling Evolution of Corporate Greenwashing
-- Naomi Klein, Get Ready for the First Shocks of Trump's Disaster Capitalism

Week Six

Tuesday, August 8 {Green Urbanity}
PRESENTATION: Paul A. and Rebecca
-- Mike Davis, Slum Ecology
-- Mike Davis, Sinister Paradise: Does the Road to the Future End at Dubai?
-- Stewart Brand, How Slums Can Save the Planet
-- Bob Berwyn, To Keep Cities Cool We Must Green Them Right
-- Joshua Leon, What Broadacre City Can Teach Us
-- Annalee Newitz and Emily Stamm, 10 Failed Utopian Cities That Influenced the Future

Wednesday, August 9 {Tech Talk}
PRESENTATION: Paul I. 
-- John Zerzan, Against Technology
-- Kirkpatrick Sale, Lessons from the Luddites
-- Bryan Walsh, Your Data Is Dirty
-- Aaron Labaree, Our Science Fiction Apocalypse
-- Marc Stiegler, The Gentle Seduction
-- Naomi Klein, Geoengineering: Testing the Waters
-- Karl Mathiesen, Is Geoengineering A Bad Idea?

Thursday, August 10 {Final Symposium} (Hand in Final Project, Keyword Map)